Communicating information about recycled water: the effect of superordinate identity

Schultz, Tracy (2012). Communicating information about recycled water: the effect of superordinate identity Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Schultz, Tracy
Thesis Title Communicating information about recycled water: the effect of superordinate identity
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-13
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Kelly Fielding
Total pages 124
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Despite the need to source alternative water resources, Australia is yet to introduce a recycled water scheme for drinking purposes. This is often attributed to a lack of public support. The current study investigated whether awareness of a shared superordinate identity can positively enhance the impact of information on community responses to recycled drinking water. Members of the south east Queensland community (N = 202) were recruited for an online, experimental study. The salience of participants’ superordinate identity (i.e. south east Queenslander) was manipulated. Information about recycled water was then presented and attributed to scientists that shared the superordinate identity or simply to scientists, with no mention of a shared superordinate identity. A hanging control group was also included. The dependent variables of favourability, trust and perceived knowledge were taken pre (Time 1) and post manipulations (Time 2). Consistent with past research, the results showed that the provision of information increased participants’ favourability and perceived knowledge from Time 1 to Time 2. However, the effect of awareness of a shared superordinate identity on participant responses was contingent upon the participants’ level of identification with the superordinate identity. Participants who were made aware of the superordinate identity, and who identified strongly with the superordinate identity, had higher levels of favourability towards recycled water when the information was attributed to scientists’ that shared the superordinate identity compared to when the scientists’ superordinate identity was unknown. The author will discuss the results in relation to social identity approaches and the implications for future recycled water communication campaigns.
Keyword Recycled water
Effect of superordinate identity

 
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Created: Fri, 08 Mar 2013, 09:53:44 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology