Responding to difficulty: how implicit theories of ability influence effort, performance and self-efficacy

Palada, Hector (2012). Responding to difficulty: how implicit theories of ability influence effort, performance and self-efficacy Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
PALADAHector4071thesis2012.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 1.76MB 13
Author Palada, Hector
Thesis Title Responding to difficulty: how implicit theories of ability influence effort, performance and self-efficacy
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Andrew Neal
Total pages 99
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The current study examined the motivational processes behind implicit theories of ability and self-efficacy when people engage in difficult tasks. We proposed a performance model to examine how implicit theories of ability and self-efficacy influence individuals‟ effort mobilization in response to difficulty, and we examined the implications this has on performance outcomes. We also proposed a self-efficacy model to examine the influence of previous performance, and its interaction with effort mobilization and perceived difficulty on subsequent self-efficacy. We examined whether implicit theories of ability would moderate how these variables influence self-efficacy. We used a longitudinal research design to test these models. Seventy-five participants were measured on implicit theories of ability, and they completed a digit span task and mental rotation task. Each task was repeated over two blocks, and each block consisted of several trials that ranged from easy to very hard difficulty levels. Participants provided self-report measures of self-efficacy, perceived task difficulty, and effort allocation throughout the experiment. Performance was measured as the proportion of correct responses to items in each task. The performance model revealed that individuals increased their efforts in response to difficulty in order to attenuate the negative effects of difficulty on performance outcomes. Implicit theories of ability and self-efficacy did not influence how individuals mobilized their efforts in response to difficulty. The self-efficacy model revealed that previous performance was positively related to subsequent self-efficacy, while previous experiences of difficulty was negatively related to subsequent self-efficacy. The results highlight the importance of maintaining efforts in response to difficulty, and further investigating the motivational processes that influence how individuals respond to difficulty.
Keyword Responding to difficulty
Implicit theories of abilty and self-efficacy

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 07 Mar 2013, 15:19:20 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology