Do actions speak louder than words? The influence of verb embodiment on naming actions in picture-word interference

Lister, Jessica (2012). Do actions speak louder than words? The influence of verb embodiment on naming actions in picture-word interference Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
LISTERJessica4071thesis2012.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 661.33KB 0
Author Lister, Jessica
Thesis Title Do actions speak louder than words? The influence of verb embodiment on naming actions in picture-word interference
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Greig de Zubicaray
Total pages 58
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Naming studies have produced a series of equivocal results for semantic effects of verbs, which are difficult to interpret using models of lexical access developed based primarily on effects observed with nouns. However, the failure to differentiate verbs on the basis of transitivity (i.e. object use) may have confounded results of these previous studies. Inconsistencies may also arise from difficulties determining categorical representations for verbs. This thesis aims to address previous methodological limitations by manipulating both transitivity and body part specific categorical relations of verbs in a picture-word-interference (PWI) paradigm. Effector specific TARGET-distractor relations were manipulated to be congruent (LIFTING-raising; WALKING-strolling) incongruent (LIFTING-shutting; WALKING-leaping) or unrelated (LIFTING-tasting; WALKING-hearing) in a balanced design, for transitive (Experiment 1) and intransitive (Experiment 2) verbs, respectively. Analyses of naming latencies for transitive verbs revealed both semantic interference and facilitation effects. Conversely, analyses for intransitive verbs revealed no evidence for semantic interference or facilitation effects. Furthermore, results with intransitive verbs do not support proposals of a semantic categorisation in terms of effector-specific relations. These results suggest potential confounds account for the effects observed with transitive verbs, such that effects may be driven by functional associative relationships or shared tool-object features involved in completing these actions. Overall, these results suggest previous inconsistencies for PWI studies may be a result of a variety of object-noun status confounds for transitive verbs, and support that semantic effects may not occur reliably across grammatical class.
Keyword Influence of verb embodiment
Naming actions
Picture-word interference

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 05 Mar 2013, 14:53:06 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology