Enhanced autonomy as a stress management intervention and the moderating effect of general self-efficacy

Leung, Miu Ying (2012). Enhanced autonomy as a stress management intervention and the moderating effect of general self-efficacy Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Leung, Miu Ying
Thesis Title Enhanced autonomy as a stress management intervention and the moderating effect of general self-efficacy
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Stacey Parker
Total pages 83
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The purposes of this experimental study were (1) to examine the effectiveness of a brief enhanced autonomy intervention, and (2) to investigate the moderating effect of general self-efficacy on the effectiveness of the intervention. This enhanced autonomy intervention involved; (1)control being introduced as an available resource to assist participants with an inbox activity, and (2) enhancing participants’positive appraisal of control as a useful resource. Participants (N = 81) were randomly assigned to either the enhanced autonomy intervention or a waitlist condition. They completed two trials of an inbox activity, in which the intervention was implemented in between trials. The effectiveness of the intervention was examined using measures of anxiety, problem-focused types of coping strategies, and objective performance on the inbox task across two trials. Performance on a vigilance task was included as a resource depletion measure. Results revealed that the intervention was effective in reducing participants’anxiety and increasing their active coping from trial 1 to trial 2. However, it was found that participants who received the intervention experienced a greater depletion of cognitive resource, suggesting a negative impact of enhanced autonomy. Results indicated that those with high general self-efficacy reported more planning coping and active coping overall. Nevertheless, no three-way interactions emerged, indicating that general self-efficacy did not moderate the effectiveness of the intervention. Future research directions and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
Keyword Enhanced autonomy
Stress management intervention
General self-efficacy

 
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Created: Tue, 05 Mar 2013, 14:26:12 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology