Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens

Alton, Lesley A., Portugal, Steven J. and White, Craig R. (2013) Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 164 2: 363-367. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.11.012


Author Alton, Lesley A.
Portugal, Steven J.
White, Craig R.
Title Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens
Formatted title
Balancing the competing requirements of air-breathing and display behaviour during male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens
Journal name Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-6433
1531-4332
Publication date 2013-02
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cbpa.2012.11.012
Volume 164
Issue 2
Start page 363
End page 367
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Air-breathing fish of the Anabantoidei group meet their metabolic requirements for oxygen through both aerial and aquatic gas exchange. Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens are anabantoids that frequently engage in aggressive male–male interactions which cause significant increases in metabolic rate and oxygen requirements. These interactions involve opercular flaring behaviour that is thought to limit aquatic oxygen uptake, and combines with the increase in metabolic rate to cause an increase in air-breathing behaviour. Air-breathing events interrupt display behaviour and increase risk of predation, raising the question of how Siamese fighting fish manage their oxygen requirements during agonistic encounters. Using open-flow respirometry, we measured rate of oxygen consumption in displaying fish to determine if males increase oxygen uptake per breath to minimise visits to the surface, or increase their reliance on aquatic oxygen uptake. We found that the increased oxygen requirements of Siamese fighting fish during display behaviour were met by increased oxygen uptake from the air with no significant changes in aquatic oxygen uptake. The increased aerial oxygen uptake was achieved almost entirely by an increase in air-breathing frequency. We conclude that limitations imposed by the reduced gill surface area of air-breathing fish restrict the ability of Siamese fighting fish to increase aquatic uptake, and limitations of the air-breathing organ of anabantoids largely restrict their capacity to increase oxygen uptake per breath. The resulting need to increase surfacing frequency during metabolically demanding agonistic encounters has presumably contributed to the evolution of the stereotyped surfacing behaviour seen during male–male interactions, during which one of the fish will lead the other to the surface, and each will take a breath of air.
Keyword Agonistic behaviour
Bimodal gas exchange
Metabolic rate
Opercular flaring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 22 November 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 03 Mar 2013, 01:09:10 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences