Neglected Tropical Diseases of Oceania: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Opportunities for Control

Kline, Kevin, McCarthy, James S., Pearson, Mark, Loukas, Alex and Hotez, Peter J. (2013) Neglected Tropical Diseases of Oceania: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Opportunities for Control. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 7 1: e1755.1-e1755.9. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001755


Author Kline, Kevin
McCarthy, James S.
Pearson, Mark
Loukas, Alex
Hotez, Peter J.
Title Neglected Tropical Diseases of Oceania: Review of Their Prevalence, Distribution, and Opportunities for Control
Journal name PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1935-2735
Publication date 2013-01-31
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001755
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue 1
Start page e1755.1
End page e1755.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Among Oceania’s population of 35 million people, the greatest number living in poverty currently live in Papua New Guinea (PNG), Fiji, Vanuatu, and the
Solomon Islands. These impoverished populations are at high risk for selected NTDs, including Necator americanus hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF), balantidiasis, yaws, trachoma, leprosy, and scabies, in addition to outbreaks of dengue and other arboviral infections including Japanese encephalitis virus infection.  PNG stands out for having the largest number of cases and highest prevalence for most of these NTDs. However, Australia’s Aboriginal population also suffers from a range of significant NTDs. Through the Pacific Programme to
Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis, enormous strides have been made in eliminating LF in Oceania through programs of mass drug administration (MDA), although LF remains widespread in PNG. There are opportunities to scale up MDA for PNG’s major NTDs, which could be accomplished through an integrated package that combines albendazole, ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and azithromycin, in a program of national control. Australia’s Aboriginal population may benefit from appropriately integrated MDA into primary health care systems. Several emerging viral NTDs remain important threats to the region.
Keyword Papua New Guinea
Transmitted Helminth Infections
North West Australia
New Zealand
Aboriginal Community
Lymphatic Filariasis
Bartonella Henselae
Hookworm Infection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 29 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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