What's mine is yours and what's yours is mine: the concept of ownership and distance perception

Isaacs, Amy (2012). What's mine is yours and what's yours is mine: the concept of ownership and distance perception Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Isaacs, Amy
Thesis Title What's mine is yours and what's yours is mine: the concept of ownership and distance perception
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Ada Kritikos
Total pages 64
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Previous research has indicated that the concept of ownership impacts the visuomotor system but the influence it has on distance perception has not been examined. In Experiment 1, motion capture was utilized as participants placed owned, unowned and other-owned mugs at one of three distances from themselves. Based on past findings, it was expected that 23 participants would underestimate distances for their own mug and would overestimate distances for the other-owned mug. Results suggest an aversion to interact with other-owned objects as ownership was found to influence peak lift height and movement duration but not distance perception. Experiment 2 was run concurrently and we speculated the influence of ownership on distance perception should be bidirectional: a near-placed object should be perceived more readily as owned by the participant interacting with it, than a far-placed object. For each trial 36 participants placed one of three mugs on one of three designated places in front of them (near, middle and far) and then placed it back on the tray beside them. One mug was placed closest to participanst sixty percent of trials. At the end of the experiment participants were asked to quickly choose a mug to take home. Participants should choose the mug most frequently placed closest to them significantly above chance. Results suggest this is not the case as the mug in the „near‟ position was not chosen more frequently.
Keyword Ownership
Distance perception
Kinematics

 
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Created: Fri, 01 Mar 2013, 15:29:06 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology