The association between parent factors and child eczema behaviour

Hughes, Brenda (2012). The association between parent factors and child eczema behaviour Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Hughes, Brenda
Thesis Title The association between parent factors and child eczema behaviour
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Alina Morawska
Total pages 62
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Eczema is an increasingly common chronic skin condition affecting many children, often causing significant impairment to the quality of life for both child and family. Children with eczema have been identified as being at risk for sleeping, behavioural, and emotional difficulties. Parenting children with eczema has been recognised as a difficult task, posing unique challenges for parents. Dysfunctional parenting styles, low parent self-efficacy, and poor parental psychosocial health have been associated with the severity of the child’s condition and behaviour. Majority of research in this area, however, is reliant on self-report measures. The current study aims to address this gap using observational measures. Participants were 50 parents of children with eczema aged 2 to 10, with concurrent behavioural/emotional problems or illness management concerns. The current study examined observed parenting practices and child behavioural reactions in parent-child interactions during illness management. A battery of questionnaires measured parent psychosocial health, parent-reported child eczema behaviour problems, and parent’s confidence in managing these behaviours. It was hypothesised that poor parental wellbeing, low parent self-efficacy for the management of eczema behaviour, and observed ineffective parenting practices would be associated with a higher frequency of observed and parent-reported child eczema behavioural problems. It was also hypothesised that parent factors would uniquely predict observed and parent-reported child eczema behaviour problems over and above socio-demographic variables. No association between parent factors and observed child behaviour was found. However, parent-reported child eczema behaviour problems were associated with parent factors, as predicted. Furthermore, self-efficacy for the management of child eczema behaviour problems predicted parent-reported problematic child eczema behaviour problems over and above socio-demographic variables. Findings and implications are presented and discussed.
Keyword Child eczema behaviour
Parent factors

 
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Created: Fri, 01 Mar 2013, 15:13:48 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology