The feasibility and validity of a remote pulse oximetry system for pulmonary rehabilitation: a pilot study

Tang, Jonathan, Mandrusiak, Allison and Russell, Trevor (2012) The feasibility and validity of a remote pulse oximetry system for pulmonary rehabilitation: a pilot study. International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, 2012 798791.1-798791.7. doi:10.1155/2012/798791

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Author Tang, Jonathan
Mandrusiak, Allison
Russell, Trevor
Title The feasibility and validity of a remote pulse oximetry system for pulmonary rehabilitation: a pilot study
Journal name International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1687-6415
1687-6423
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2012/798791
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2012
Start page 798791.1
End page 798791.7
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Hindawi Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Pulmonary rehabilitation is an effective treatment for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, access to these services is limited especially in rural and remote areas. Telerehabilitation has the potential to deliver pulmonary rehabilitation programs to these communities. The aim of this study was threefold: to establish the technical feasibility of transmitting real-time pulse oximetry data, determine the validity of remote measurements compared to conventional face-to-face measures, and evaluate the participants’ perception of the usability of the technology. Thirty-seven healthy individuals participated in a single remote pulmonary rehabilitation exercise session, conducted using the eHAB telerehabilitation system. Validity was assessed by comparing the participant's oxygen saturation and heart rate with the data set received at the therapist’s remote location. There was an 80% exact agreement between participant and therapist data sets. The mean absolute difference and Bland and Altman’s limits of agreement fell within the minimum clinically important difference for both oxygen saturation and heart rate values. Participants found the system easy to use and felt confident that they would be able to use it at home. Remote measurement of pulse oximetry data for a pulmonary rehabilitation exercise session was feasible and valid when compared to conventional face-to-face methods.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article ID 798791

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 01 Mar 2013, 11:36:48 EST by Ms Allison Mandrusiak on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences