Conditions for single vision: evidence for a fusional volume surrounding the vertical horopter

Harrold, Ashleigh (2012). Conditions for single vision: evidence for a fusional volume surrounding the vertical horopter Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Harrold, Ashleigh
Thesis Title Conditions for single vision: evidence for a fusional volume surrounding the vertical horopter
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Philip Grove
Total pages 73
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Binocular fusion is the process by which we are able to perceive the world as single even though we are receiving two slightly differing views of the world from our eyes. Binocular fusion is well documented in the research on the empirical horizontal horopter; this area is known as Panum’s fusional area. No research currently exists regarding fusion around the vertical horopter. The present study aimed to examine binocular fusion around the vertical horopter. 20 participants were involved in the first experiment which consisted of three tasks, torsion, a measure of the vertical horopter and a measure of fusion. A measure of torsion was taken to ensure the elimination of torsional movements. It was hypothesized that the vertical horopter would be tilted top back as previously found and that a clear area of fusion centered around the vertical horopter would be found. Furthermore it was hypothesized that the fusional volume would be smaller around the point of fixation and larger as elevation from fixation increased. Results found the first evidence of a fusional area and a general tilt in the vertical horopter. There was no evidence for the predicted shape of the fusional volume or that it tilted with the vertical horopter. As such a second experiment was conducted with six experienced participants on the same torsion and vertical horopter tasks and an adapted fusion task. Once again results supported the top back tilt of the horopter and the presence of a fusional volume. The vertical horopter appears to form the centre of the fusional area and it was tilted with the horopter. There was no support for the hypothesized shape of the fusional volume. Conclusions were discussed in light of future research and implications of the findings.
Keyword Binocular fusion
Vertical horopter

 
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Created: Thu, 28 Feb 2013, 14:08:38 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology