Examining healthy eating from a social perspective: can social identity salience influence what we order from a menu?

Frisby, Jessica (2012). Examining healthy eating from a social perspective: can social identity salience influence what we order from a menu? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Frisby, Jessica
Thesis Title Examining healthy eating from a social perspective: can social identity salience influence what we order from a menu?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-11
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jolanda Jetten
Total pages 51
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Self-categorization theory proposes that individuals define themselves according to the groups they belong to, and form self-stereotypes based on in-group norms and inter-group comparisons. This can have negative consequences on an individual’s health in instances where health promotion behaviours are perceived to be incongruent with group attitudes and values. The current study aims to explore this phenomenon in the field of healthy eating, and investigate if cuing group identity and different inter-group comparisons can have differential influences on eating choices. This was specifically examined in the context of Australia, where many citizens love to eat fatty, red meats on a regular basis and recognize this behaviour to be congruent with their national identity, despite the health risk. Undergraduate students (N = 74) from the University of Queensland were recruited to participate in a questionnaire that manipulated identity salience (social vs. personal) and comparative group context (upward vs. downward). Participants’ healthy eating values, intentions and behaviour were subsequently measured. It was predicted that cuing group identity would elicit the strongest differences between comparison groups, with upward comparisons resulting in lower indications of healthy eating and downward comparisons encouraging healthier values, intentions and behaviour. The results indicated similar results for conditions that cued both personal and social identity, however the direction of all significant effects was the opposite of what was hypothesised – participants with upward comparisons gave healthier indications than those cued with a downward comparison.
Keyword Healthy eating
Social identity salience

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Feb 2013, 15:12:30 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology