Investigating the role of spelling and pronunciation in word representations

Frampton, Emily (2012). Investigating the role of spelling and pronunciation in word representations Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Frampton, Emily
Thesis Title Investigating the role of spelling and pronunciation in word representations
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jennifer Burt
Total pages 62
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Two experiments were conducted to investigate the role of spelling and pronunciation in memories of words. In Experiment 1 with familiar words, participants performed a category judgment task at study, with visual and audio presentations of words. Participants were then tested on their memory of the words, by presenting a word and asking participants if they heard it during the judgment task and whether they saw it. Although it was not significant, a trend was found indicating that people are more accurate when asked if they heard a word than when asked if they saw a word. In Experiment 2, the spelling, pronunciation and meaning (picture and definition) of pseudowords were learnt. Either the spelling of the word (orthography) or the pronunciation (phonology) was primarily paired with either the definition or the picture. Participants were then tested with either a spelling choice test or audio recognition test. For both tests, participants were cued half of the time with pictures and half of the time with definitions. For the spelling test, it was found that when the type of meaning cue used at test matched the meaning format most commonly paired with spelling during training, participants were more accurate. Contrary to predictions, for the audio recognition test, there was no effect of cuing for auditory pseudowords trained mainly with pictures, and auditory pseudowords trained mainly with definitions showed an advantage for picture cues. The results are discussed in relation to theories about word representations.
Keyword Spelling and pronunciation
Word representations

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Feb 2013, 14:01:30 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology