Get outside and smell the roses: the benefits of contact with nature during designated work-breaks

Fenwick, Caitlin (2012). Get outside and smell the roses: the benefits of contact with nature during designated work-breaks Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Fenwick, Caitlin
Thesis Title Get outside and smell the roses: the benefits of contact with nature during designated work-breaks
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-10-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Bernadette Watson
Total pages 87
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Contact with nature in the workplace is related to decreased stress, higher job satisfaction and better health and well-being. Kaplan’s attention restoration theory posits that spending time in nature leads to mental restoration, which is associated with better well-being. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between contact with nature during designated work breaks and well-being outcomes, including general health, stress, and job satisfaction, by applying Kaplan’s attention restoration framework. Seventeen participants kept a diary of their lunch break habits across twelve working days and recorded the extent of their contact with nature, perceived restorativeness of their lunch break environment and reported levels of attentional function. Self-reported stress, job satisfaction, general physical health and wellbeing were measured proceeding the diary phase of the study. The prediction that natural environments would be related to perceived restorativeness was not supported. Contrary to predictions, contact with nature did not predict attentional function. Furthermore, there was no moderating effect of degree of nature contact, contrary to predictions. The prediction that contact with nature would be related to general health and well-being was not supported. Contrary to predictions, the relationship between contact with nature and general well-being was not mediated by attentional function. These findings suggest that contact with nature during work-breaks does not affect the measured outcomes. However, future research addressing the methodological shortcomings of this study is needed.
Keyword Contact with nature
Kaplan's attention restoration theory

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Feb 2013, 13:42:51 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology