Prevalence of Physical Activity and Its Association with Self-Reported Memory: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Ms Yirui Wang (2013). Prevalence of Physical Activity and Its Association with Self-Reported Memory: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ms Yirui Wang
Thesis Title Prevalence of Physical Activity and Its Association with Self-Reported Memory: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-02-21
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Professor Nancy Pachana
Professor Wendy Brown
Total pages 145
Total black and white pages 145
Language eng
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract/Summary This research examined the prevalence of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour (i.e., prolonged sitting) in a sample of 5470 middle-aged Australian women. It also explored the relationship between PA and memory complaints. Respondents were randomly selected from the Medicare national health insurance database for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. For this research, data collected at the surveys in 2004, 2007 and 2010 were used. Participants included a large, national sample of community-dwelling, relatively healthy women who reported no difficulty walking 100 meters and had no missing values on the main outcome or explanatory variables at each survey. The results indicated that a substantial proportion of the middle-aged Australian women achieved or exceeded the recommended 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity PA (64.3% in 2004, 68.2% in 2007, and 65.7% in 2010). Contrary to expectation, the self-reported levels of leisure/transport PA increased from 2004 to 2010. Further investigation revealed that women with low education, low socio-economic status, high body mass index (BMI), and smokers may be less likely to meet the recommendation. The average sitting time among these women was high (42.6 hours per week in 2004, 45.8 hours per week in 2007, and 45.1 hours per week in 2010). Working women reported longer average sitting times and non-working women, and women with high BMI reported longer sitting times than those with low BMI. The cross-sectional analyses indicated that a higher level of total PA (including leisure/transport and intense domestic PA) was associated with a lower rate of perceived decline in memory function. The association remained true following adjustment for a number of confounding variables in two of the three surveys. The research highlights the need for more empirical work, especially intervention studies, to understand the complex relationships between PA and memory complaints.
Keyword Physical acitivity
self-reported memory
ALSWH

 
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Created: Thu, 21 Feb 2013, 17:39:48 EST by Ms Yirui Wang on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences