Melodic medical alarms: the effects of distraction on alarm identification

Atyeo, James (2012). Melodic medical alarms: the effects of distraction on alarm identification Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Atyeo, James
Thesis Title Melodic medical alarms: the effects of distraction on alarm identification
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-11-02
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Penelope Sanderson
Total pages 66
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the learnability and distinguishability of two sets of melodic medical equipment alarms. One set was developed for the IEC 60101-1-8 international standard and has little differentiation between sounds, whereas the other was developed by Patterson and Edworthy in 1986 and has marked differentiation between sounds. Participants were 31 nurses with less than one year of formal music training. They were randomly assigned to learn either the IEC or Patterson-Edworthy set of alarm sounds and then tested on their ability to identify the alarms while completing a distracting task. Participants completed two testing sessions with distractor tasks of varying difficulty. Results suggest that the Patterson-Edworthy alarms are easier for nurses to learn and identify, irrespective of the level of distraction experienced. It is concluded that the Patterson-Edworthy alarms may represent a suitable alternative to replace the IEC alarms in the impending revision of the standard, but that further testing is first required.
Keyword Melodic medical alarm systems
Differentiation between sounds

 
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Created: Wed, 20 Feb 2013, 13:42:22 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology