Third party customers infecting other customers for better or for worse

Tombs, Alastair G. and McColl-Kennedy, Janet R. (2013) Third party customers infecting other customers for better or for worse. Psychology and Marketing, 30 3: 277-292. doi:10.1002/mar.20604

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Author Tombs, Alastair G.
McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
Title Third party customers infecting other customers for better or for worse
Journal name Psychology and Marketing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1520-6793
0742-6046
Publication date 2013-03
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/mar.20604
Open Access Status
Volume 30
Issue 3
Start page 277
End page 292
Total pages 16
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract In this article the effect of the displayed emotions of third party customers and purchase occasion on customers are examined, even when there is no direct interaction between customers. Three independent studies, including two experiments are employed. The first experiment examines the effects of both positive and negative displayed emotions of third party customers and purchase occasion on customer emotions and repurchase intentions, when there is no direct interaction between customers. The second experiment captures changes in the customers’ affective state on a moment-by-moment basis enabling differentiation between the effects of the service environment and the intervention of exposure to the displayed emotions of third party customers. Results show that customers are “infected” by the displayed emotions of third party customers even when there is no direct interaction between the customers. It is also demonstrated that the purchase occasion affects the type and intensity of emotions customers experience and the likelihood of repurchase. Implications for scholarly research and retailers are discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 18 Feb 2013, 14:17:51 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School