Telephone referral education, and evidence of retention and transfer after six-months

Marshall, Stuart D., Harrison, Julia C. and Flanagan, Brendan (2012) Telephone referral education, and evidence of retention and transfer after six-months. BMC Medical Education, 12 1: 38.1-38.7. doi:10.1186/1472-6920-12-38


Author Marshall, Stuart D.
Harrison, Julia C.
Flanagan, Brendan
Total Author Count Override 3
Title Telephone referral education, and evidence of retention and transfer after six-months
Journal name BMC Medical Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1472-6920
Publication date 2012-06-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-12-38
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Issue 1
Start page 38.1
End page 38.7
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Effective communication between clinicians is essential for safe, efficient healthcare. We undertook a study to determine the longer-term effectiveness of an education session employing a structured method to teach referral-making skills to medical students.

Methods: All final year medical students received a forty-five minute education intervention consisting: discussion of effective telephone referrals; video viewing and critique; explanation, demonstration and practice using ISBAR; provision of a memory aid for use in their clinical work. Audio recordings were taken during a subsequent standardised simulation scenario and blindly assessed using a validated scoring system. Recordings were taken immediately before (control), several hours after (intervention), and at approximately six months after the education. Retention of the acronym and self-reports of transfer to the clinical environment were measured with a questionnaire at eight months.

Results: Referral clarity at six months was significantly improved from pre-intervention, and referral content showed a trend towards improvement. Both measures were lower than the immediate post-education test. The ISBAR acronym was remembered by 59.4% (n = 95/160) and used by the vast majority of the respondents who had made a clinical telephone referral (n = 135/143; 94.4%).

Conclusions: A brief education session improved telephone communication in a simulated environment above baseline for over six months, achieved functional retention of the acronym over a seven to eight month period and resulted in self reports of transfer of the learning into practice.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 38

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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