“Oh, you've got such a strong accent”: language identity intersecting with professional identity in the human services in Australia

Harrison, Gai (2013) “Oh, you've got such a strong accent”: language identity intersecting with professional identity in the human services in Australia. International Migration, 51 5: 192-204. doi:10.1111/imig.12005

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Harrison, Gai
Title “Oh, you've got such a strong accent”: language identity intersecting with professional identity in the human services in Australia
Journal name International Migration   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7985
1468-2435
Publication date 2013-10
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/imig.12005
Volume 51
Issue 5
Start page 192
End page 204
Total pages 13
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Language operates as a form of differentially valued cultural capital that is an influential factor in educational and employment outcomes. English in particular represents a valuable form of linguistic capital in both the broader world market and many regional and local contexts. This article, focusing on one group of professionals, draws on an exploratory study carried out with overseas-born bilingual social workers residing in Australia, who reflect on how their language identities intersect with their professional identities in the human services workplace. Although most informants identified tangible benefits associated with being bilingual, especially in terms of working with a diverse clientele, they were equally aware of how being categorized as a ‘non-native’ speaker of English could diminish their professional credibility and thwart their chances of upward mobility in the workplace. In this regard, this article highlights inconsistencies in how difference is valued in the human services workplace, implicating a more covert process of linguistic othering.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 29 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 11 Feb 2013, 16:04:14 EST by Ms Gai Harrison on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services