The possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children

Capio, Catherine M., Sit, Cindy H.P., Abernethy, Bruce and Masters, Rich S.W. (2012) The possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children. Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, 4 1.1-1.4. doi:10.1186/1758-2555-4-1


Author Capio, Catherine M.
Sit, Cindy H.P.
Abernethy, Bruce
Masters, Rich S.W.
Title The possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children
Journal name Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-2555
Publication date 2012-01-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1758-2555-4-1
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 4
Start page 1.1
End page 1.4
Total pages 4
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract An implicit approach to motor learning suggests that relatively complex movement skills may be better acquired in environments that constrain errors during the initial stages of practice. This current concept paper proposes that reducing the number of errors committed during motor learning leads to stable performance when attention demands are increased by concurrent cognitive tasks. While it appears that this approach to practice may be beneficial for motor learning, further studies are needed to both confirm this advantage and better understand the underlying mechanisms. An approach involving error minimization during early learning may have important applications in paediatric rehabilitation.
Keyword Motor learning
Children
Rehabilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # 1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 11 Feb 2013, 22:14:18 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences