Household transmission of respiratory viruses - assessment of viral, individual and household characteristics in a population study of healthy Australian adults

McCaw, James M., Howard, Peter F., Richmond, Peter C., Nissen, Michael, Sloots, Theo, Lambert, Stephen B., Lai, Michael, Greenberg, Michael, Nolan, Terry and McVernon, Jodie (2012) Household transmission of respiratory viruses - assessment of viral, individual and household characteristics in a population study of healthy Australian adults. BMC Infectious Diseases, 12 345.1-345.10. doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-345


Author McCaw, James M.
Howard, Peter F.
Richmond, Peter C.
Nissen, Michael
Sloots, Theo
Lambert, Stephen B.
Lai, Michael
Greenberg, Michael
Nolan, Terry
McVernon, Jodie
Title Household transmission of respiratory viruses - assessment of viral, individual and household characteristics in a population study of healthy Australian adults
Journal name BMC Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2334
Publication date 2012-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-12-345
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Start page 345.1
End page 345.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Household transmission of influenza-like illness (ILI) may vary with viral and demographic characteristics. We examined the effect of these factors in a population-based sample of adults with ILI.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study in community-dwelling Australian adults nested within an influenza vaccine effectiveness trial. On presentation with ILI, participants were swabbed for a range of respiratory viruses and asked to return a questionnaire collecting details of household members with or without similar symptoms. We used logistic and Poisson regression to assess the key characteristics of household transmission.

Results: 258 participants from multi-occupancy households experienced 279 ILI episodes and returned a questionnaire. Of these, 183 were the primary case in the household allowing assessment of factors associated with transmission. Transmission was significantly associated in univariate analyses with female sex (27% vs. 13%, risk ratio (RR) = 2.13 (1.08, 4.21)) and the presence of a child in the house (33% vs. 17%, RR = 1.90 (1.11, 3.26)). The secondary household attack proportion (SHAP) was 0.14, higher if influenza was isolated (RR = 2.1 (1.0, 4.5)). Vaccinated participants who nonetheless became infected with influenza had a higher SHAP (Incidence RR = 5.24 (2.17, 12.6)).

Conclusions: The increased SHAP in households of vaccinated participants who nonetheless had confirmed influenza infection supports the hypothesis that in years of vaccine mismatch, not only is influenza vaccine less protective for the vaccine recipient, but that the population's immunity is also lower.
Keyword Epidemiology
Transmission
Influenza
Human
Influenza vaccines
Respiratory tract infection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 345

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Medicine Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 10 Feb 2013, 11:49:48 EST by System User on behalf of School of Medicine