Can the built environment reduce health inequalities? A study of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and walking for transport

Turrell, Gavin, Haynes, Michele, Wilson, Lee-Ann and Giles-Corti, Billie (2013) Can the built environment reduce health inequalities? A study of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and walking for transport. Health & Place, 19 1: 89-98. doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.10.008


Author Turrell, Gavin
Haynes, Michele
Wilson, Lee-Ann
Giles-Corti, Billie
Title Can the built environment reduce health inequalities? A study of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage and walking for transport
Journal name Health & Place   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1353-8292
1873-2054
Publication date 2013-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.10.008
Open Access Status
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 89
End page 98
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Residents of socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are more likely to walk for transport than their counterparts in advantaged neighbourhoods; however, the reasons for higher rates of transport walking in poorer neighbourhoods remain unclear. We investigated this issue using data from the HABITAT study of physical activity among 11,037 mid-aged residents of 200 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia. Using a five-step mediation analysis and multilevel regression, we found that higher levels of walking for transport in disadvantaged neighbourhoods was associated with living in a built environment more conducive to walking (i.e. greater street connectivity and land use mix) and residents of these neighbourhoods having more limited access to a motor vehicle. The health benefits that accrue to residents of disadvantaged neighbourhoods as a result of their higher levels of walking for transport might help offset the negative effects of less healthy behaviours (e.g. smoking, poor diet), thus serving to contain or reduce neighbourhood inequalities in chronic disease.
Keyword Health inequalities
Walking
Built environment
Neighbourhood
Transport
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 10 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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