Potential distribution and risk assessment of an invasive plant species: a case study of Hymenachne amplexicaulis in Australia

Wearne, L. J., Ko, D., Hannan-Jones, M. and Calvert, M. (2013) Potential distribution and risk assessment of an invasive plant species: a case study of Hymenachne amplexicaulis in Australia. Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, 19 1: 53-79. doi:10.1080/10807039.2012.632293


Author Wearne, L. J.
Ko, D.
Hannan-Jones, M.
Calvert, M.
Title Potential distribution and risk assessment of an invasive plant species: a case study of Hymenachne amplexicaulis in Australia
Formatted title
Potential distribution and risk assessment of an invasive plant species: a case study of Hymenachne amplexicaulis in Australia
Journal name Human and Ecological Risk Assessment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1080-7039
1549-7860
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10807039.2012.632293
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 53
End page 79
Total pages 27
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Given the limited resources available for weed management, a strategic approach is required to give the "best bang for your buck." The current study incorporates: (1) a model ensemble approach to identify areas of uncertainty and commonality regarding a species invasive potential, (2) current distribution of the invaded species, and (3) connectivity of systems to identify target regions and focus efforts for more effective management. Uncertainty in the prediction of suitable habitat for H. amplexicaulis (study species) in Australia was addressed in an ensemble-forecasting approach to compare distributional scenarios from four models (CLIMATCH; CLIMEX; boosted regression trees [BRT]; maximum entropy [Maxent]). Models were built using subsets of occurrence and environmental data. Catchment risk was determined through incorporating habitat suitability, the current abundance and distribution of H. amplexicaulis, and catchment connectivity. Our results indicate geographic differences between predictions of different approaches. Despite these differences a number of catchments in northern, central, and southern Australia were identified as high risk of invasion or further spread by all models suggesting they should be given priority for the management of H. amplexicaulis. The study also highlighted the utility of ensemble approaches in indentifying areas of uncertainty and commonality regarding the species' invasive potential.
Keyword Species distribution models
Risk assessment framework
Climate envelope models
Machine learning models
Catchment risk
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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