Conventional, hybrid and electric vehicles for Australian driving conditions. Part 2: life cycle CO2-e emissions

Sharma, R., Manzie, C., Bessede, M., Crawford, R. H. and Brear, M. J. (2013) Conventional, hybrid and electric vehicles for Australian driving conditions. Part 2: life cycle CO2-e emissions. Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, 28 63-73. doi:10.1016/j.trc.2012.12.011


Author Sharma, R.
Manzie, C.
Bessede, M.
Crawford, R. H.
Brear, M. J.
Title Conventional, hybrid and electric vehicles for Australian driving conditions. Part 2: life cycle CO2-e emissions
Journal name Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0968-090X
1879-2359
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.trc.2012.12.011
Volume 28
Start page 63
End page 73
Total pages 11
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract This paper is the second of a two part study which quantifies the economic and greenhouse performance of conventional, hybrid and fully electric passenger vehicles operating in Australian driving conditions. This second study focuses on the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions. Two vehicle sizes are considered, Class-B and Class-E, which bracket the large majority of passenger vehicles on Australian roads.Using vehicle simulation models developed in the first study, the trade-offs between the ability of increasingly electric powertrains in curtailing the tailpipe emissions and the corresponding rise in the embedded vehicle emissions have been evaluated. The sensitivity of the life cycle emissions to fuel, electricity and the change in the energy mix are all considered. In conjunction with the total cost of ownership calculated in the companion paper, this allows the cost of mitigating life cycle greenhouse gas emissions through electrification of passenger transport to be estimated under different scenarios. For Class-B vehicles, fully electric vehicles were found to have a higher total cost of ownership and higher life cycle emissions than an equivalent vehicle with an internal combustion engine. For Class-E vehicles, hybrids are found to be the most cost effective whilst also having lowest life cycle emissions under current conditions. Further, hybrid vehicles also exhibit little sensitivity in terms of greenhouse emissions and cost with large changes in system inputs.
Keyword Australian driving
Electric vehicles
Greenhouse gas emissions
Hybrid vehicles
Life cycle analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 04 Feb 2013, 14:25:39 EST by Rahul Sharma on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering