Interspecific interactions between primates, birds, bats, and squirrels may affect community composition on Borneo

Beaudrot, Lydia, Struebig, Matthew J., Meijaard, Erik, Van Balen, Sebastianus, Husson, Simon, Young, Carson F. and Marshall, Andrew J. (2013) Interspecific interactions between primates, birds, bats, and squirrels may affect community composition on Borneo. American Journal of Primatology, 75 2: 170-185. doi:10.1002/ajp.22095


Author Beaudrot, Lydia
Struebig, Matthew J.
Meijaard, Erik
Van Balen, Sebastianus
Husson, Simon
Young, Carson F.
Marshall, Andrew J.
Total Author Count Override 7
Title Interspecific interactions between primates, birds, bats, and squirrels may affect community composition on Borneo
Journal name American Journal of Primatology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0275-2565
1098-2345
Publication date 2013-02
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ajp.22095
Volume 75
Issue 2
Start page 170
End page 185
Total pages 16
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract For several decades, primatologists have been interested in understanding how sympatric primate species are able to coexist. Most of our understanding of primate community ecology derives from the assumption that these animals interact predominantly with other primates. In this study, we investigate to what extent multiple community assembly hypotheses consistent with this assumption are supported when tested with communities of primates in isolation versus with communities of primates, birds, bats, and squirrels together. We focus on vertebrate communities on the island of Borneo, where we examine the determinants of presence or absence of species, and how these communities are structured. We test for checkerboard distributions, guild proportionality, and Fox's assembly rule for favored states, and predict that statistical signals reflecting interactions between ecologically similar species will be stronger when nonprimate taxa are included in analyses. We found strong support for checkerboard distributions in several communities, particularly when taxonomic groups were combined, and after controlling for habitat effects. We found evidence of guild proportionality in some communities, but did not find significant support for Fox's assembly rule in any of the communities examined. These results demonstrate the presence of vertebrate community structure that is ecologically determined rather than randomly generated, which is a finding consistent with the interpretation that interactions within and between these taxonomic groups may have shaped species composition in these communities. This research highlights the importance of considering the broader vertebrate communities with which primates co-occur, and so we urge primatologists to explicitly consider nonprimate taxa in the study of primate ecology.
Keyword Niche differentiation
Community assembly
Sciuridae
Chiroptera
Southeast Asia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 26 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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