Health-related predictors of falls and fractures in women over 40

Nitz, J. C., Stock, L. and Khan, A. (2013) Health-related predictors of falls and fractures in women over 40. Osteoporosis International, 24 2: 613-621. doi:10.1007/s00198-012-2004-z


Author Nitz, J. C.
Stock, L.
Khan, A.
Title Health-related predictors of falls and fractures in women over 40
Journal name Osteoporosis International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Publication date 2013-02
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00198-012-2004-z
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 613
End page 621
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Summary: A longitudinal study of women aged 40–80 predicted single falls from a previous fall history and deficient vestibular integration. Multiple falls were predicted by a fall history, low activity levels, more medical conditions and deficient vestibular integration. Low bone mineral density, more medical conditions and fall history predicted fractures.

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to identify potentially modifiable health-related factors predicting falls and fractures, focussing on women over 40.

Methods: Four hundred and forty-nine women aged 40–80 years from the Longitudinal Assessment of Women study participated. Demographic information (age, BMI, medications, medical conditions and activity level), balance assessments (including timed up & go and modified clinical test for sensory interaction of balance) and measurements of bone mineral density and body composition were collected in 2001; fall and fracture data were gathered in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2010 to determine incidence.

Results: Multinomial logistic regression revealed that single falls could be predicted by a history of previous falls (OR 3.08) and being unsteady in bipedal stance on foam with eyes closed (OR 1.99). Multiple falls were predicted by a history of falls at baseline (OR 4.69), low levels of activity (OR 2.17), greater number of medical conditions (OR 1.12) and being unsteady in bipedal stance on foam with eyes closed (OR 4.21). Low bone mineral density (OR 3.13), greater number of medical conditions (OR 1.32) and a history of falls (OR 3.04) were predictive of fractures.

Conclusions: Poor health, decreased balance, and inactivity are predictive of falls and low bone mineral density, low activity level and poor health predictive fractures. Results suggest failing the balance test bipedal stance on foam with eyes closed in the presence of low activity and poor health is a valid quick screening tool for detecting potential fallers for referral for in-depth balance assessment and intervention.
Keyword Balance
Bone mineral density
Falls
Fractures
Health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online April 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 16 Jan 2013, 08:32:58 EST by Jennifer Nitz on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences