Exercise for health: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating the impact of a pragmatic, translational exercise intervention on the quality of life, function and treatment-related side effects following breast cancer

Hayes, Sandra C., Rye, Sheree, Disipio, Tracey, Yates, Patsy, Bashford, John, Pyke, Chris, Saunders, Christobel, Battistutta, Diana and Eakin, Elizabeth (2013) Exercise for health: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating the impact of a pragmatic, translational exercise intervention on the quality of life, function and treatment-related side effects following breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 137 1: 175-186. doi:10.1007/s10549-012-2331-y

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Author Hayes, Sandra C.
Rye, Sheree
Disipio, Tracey
Yates, Patsy
Bashford, John
Pyke, Chris
Saunders, Christobel
Battistutta, Diana
Eakin, Elizabeth
Title Exercise for health: a randomized, controlled trial evaluating the impact of a pragmatic, translational exercise intervention on the quality of life, function and treatment-related side effects following breast cancer
Journal name Breast Cancer Research and Treatment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-6806
1573-7217
Publication date 2013-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2331-y
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 137
Issue 1
Start page 175
End page 186
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Exercise for Health was a randomized, controlled trial designed to evaluate two modes of delivering (face-to-face [FtF] and over-the-telephone [Tel]) an 8-month translational exercise intervention, commencing 6-weeks post-breast cancer surgery (PS). Outcomes included quality of life (QoL), function (fitness and upper body) and treatment-related side effects (fatigue, lymphoedema, body mass index, menopausal symptoms, anxiety, depression and pain). Generalised estimating equation modelling determined time (baseline [5 weeks PS], mid-intervention [6 months PS], post-intervention [12 months PS]), group (FtF, Tel, Usual Care [UC]) and time-by-group effects. 194 women representative of the breast cancer population were randomised to the FtF (n = 67), Tel (n = 67) and UC (n = 60) groups. There were significant (p < 0.05) interaction effects on QoL, fitness and fatigue with differences being observed between the treatment groups and the UC group. Trends observed for the treatment groups were similar. The treatment groups reported improved QoL, fitness and fatigue over time and changes observed between baseline and post-intervention were clinically relevant. In contrast, the UC group experienced no change, or worsening QoL, fitness and fatigue, mid-intervention. Although improvements in the UC group occurred by 12-months post-surgery, the change did not meet the clinically relevant threshold. There were no differences in other treatment-related side effects between groups. This translational intervention trial, delivered either FtF or Tel, supports exercise as a form of adjuvant breast cancer therapy that can prevent declines in fitness and function during treatment and optimise recovery post-treatment.
Keyword Breast cancer
Randomized controlled trial
Exercise
Quality of life
Function
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 9 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Jan 2013, 12:28:31 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health