Predictors of sexually transmitted infection in Australian women: evidence from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Lucke, Jayne C., Herbert, Danielle L., Watson, Melanie and Loxton, Deborah (2013) Predictors of sexually transmitted infection in Australian women: evidence from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 42 2: 237-246. doi:10.1007/s10508-012-0020-x

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Author Lucke, Jayne C.
Herbert, Danielle L.
Watson, Melanie
Loxton, Deborah
Title Predictors of sexually transmitted infection in Australian women: evidence from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Journal name Archives of Sexual Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-0002
1573-2800
Publication date 2013-02-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10508-012-0020-x
Volume 42
Issue 2
Start page 237
End page 246
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract This longitudinal study examined characteristics of women diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections (STI) for the first time in their later 20s and early 30s. Participants were 6,840 women (born 1973-1978) from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Women aged 18-23 years were surveyed in 1996 (S1), 2000 (S2), 2003 (S3), and 2006 (S4). There were 269 women reporting an STI for the first time at S3 or S4. Using two multivariable logistic regression analyses (examining 18 predictor variables), these 269 women were compared (1) with 306 women who reported an STI at S2 and (2) with 5,214 women who never reported an STI across the four surveys. Women who reported an STI for the first time at S3 or S4 were less likely to have been pregnant or had a recent Pap smear compared to women reporting an STI at S2. Women reporting a first STI at S3 or S4 were less likely to have been pregnant or had a recent Pap smear compared to women reporting an STI at S2. Women were more likely to report an STI for the first time at S3 or S4 compared to women not reporting an STI at any survey if they were younger, unpartnered, had a higher number of sexual partners, had never been pregnant, were recently divorced or separated, and reported poorer access to Women's Health or Family Planning Centres at S2. These findings demonstrate the value of longitudinal studies of sexual health over the life course beyond adolescence.
Keyword Australia
Life course epidemiology
Sexual health
Sexually transmitted infections
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 16 October 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 11 Jan 2013, 22:22:37 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health