Intergenerational educational mobility on general mental health and depressive symptoms in young women

Tooth, Leigh and Mishra, Gita (2013) Intergenerational educational mobility on general mental health and depressive symptoms in young women. Quality of Life Research, 22 7: 1589-1602. doi:10.1007/s11136-012-0310-8


Author Tooth, Leigh
Mishra, Gita
Title Intergenerational educational mobility on general mental health and depressive symptoms in young women
Journal name Quality of Life Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-9343
1573-2649
Publication date 2013
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11136-012-0310-8
Volume 22
Issue 7
Start page 1589
End page 1602
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: To investigate how intergenerational educational mobility between women and their parents influences mental health/depressive symptoms in women.

Method: We studied 5,619 women aged 31–36 years in 2009 from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. The short-form-36 Mental Component Summary Scores [MCS] measured mental health and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] measured depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analyses, with adjustment for confounders, were used.

Results: Greater downward mobility from mothers (mother high to self low) [MCS regression estimate [β] −3.35; 95 % confidence interval [CI] −5.6,−1.1; CES-D β 1.94; 95 % CI, 0.7,3.2], and greater (father high to self low MCS β,-2.53; 95 % CI −4.8,−0.3] and moderate (father high to self intermediate MCS β −1.71; 95 % CI −3.3,−0.1] downward mobility from fathers were associated with poorer mental health in women. Another strongly consistent influence on poor mental health was answering ‘don’t know/not applicable’ about parental education [mother–self MCS β −1.34; 95 % CI, −2.3,−0.4; mother–self CES-D β 0.52; 95 % CI 0.01,1.0; father–self MCS β −1.19; 95 % CI −2.1,−0.3].

Conclusions: There are subtle differences for same and opposite-sex parent–daughter relationships on the impact of downwards intergenerational educational mobility on mental health in young women. These results suggest the effect of own educational attainment on mental health depends on the degree of disparity between self and parent. Future studies should consider ‘don’t know’ as a separate category rather than treating it as a ‘missing’ response.
Keyword Depressive disorder
Educational status
Intergenerational relations
Mental health
Socioeconomic factors
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 9 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Jan 2013, 10:55:40 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health