Early adulthood television viewing and cardiometabolic risk profiles in early middle age: results from a population, prospective cohort study

Stamatakis, E., Hamer, M. and Mishra, G. D. (2012) Early adulthood television viewing and cardiometabolic risk profiles in early middle age: results from a population, prospective cohort study. Diabetologia, 55 2: 311-320. doi:10.1007/s00125-011-2358-3

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Author Stamatakis, E.
Hamer, M.
Mishra, G. D.
Total Author Count Override 3
Title Early adulthood television viewing and cardiometabolic risk profiles in early middle age: results from a population, prospective cohort study
Journal name Diabetologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-186X
1432-0428
Publication date 2012-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00125-011-2358-3
Volume 55
Issue 2
Start page 311
End page 320
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims/hypothesis: Little research has been done on the long-term longitudinal associations between markers of sedentary behaviour and health risks. We hypothesised that television (TV) viewing in early to mid-adulthood predicts an adverse cardiometabolic risk factor profile in middle age independently of participation in physical activity. Methods: We used prospective data from 5,972 (2,947 men) participants of the 1958 British Birth Cohort study. TV viewing and exercise frequency were obtained at age 23 years. Daily TV viewing and weekly moderate to vigorous physical activity were assessed at age 44 years, as well as HbA 1c, triacylglycerol, total and HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and waist circumference. We used generalised linear models and multiple linear regression to examine the associations between TV viewing at age 23 years and the cardiometabolic risk markers (including a clustered cardiometabolic risk score) at 44 years, while adjusting for sex, exercise participation and TV viewing at age 44 years, and other potential confounders. Results: In the multivariable models, TV viewing frequency at age 23 years showed positive associations with C-reactive protein (generalised linear model change 12.6%, 95% CI 3.5, 22.8; p=0.005), fibrinogen (change 1.8%, 95% CI 0.3, 3.3; p=0.020), waist circumference (coefficient 1.17, 95% CI 0.32, 2.01; p=0.004), systolic (coefficient 1.44, 95% CI 0.33, 2.54; p=0.019) and diastolic (coefficient 0.75, 95% CI -0.01, 1.51; p=0.053) blood pressure, and clustered cardiometabolic risk score (men only, coefficient 0.06, 95% CI 0.01, 0.11; p=0.038). Adjustments for baseline (age 23 years) BMI attenuated these associations towards null. Conclusions/interpretation: TV viewing habits in early adulthood are associated with adverse cardiometabolic profiles in early middle adulthood that are independent of TV viewing habits and physical activity in middle age, but not independent of BMI in early adulthood
Keyword British birth cohort
Cardiovascular risk factors
Longitudinal
Metabolic
National Child Development Study
Physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 26 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 07 Jan 2013, 20:07:16 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health