Is francophone language status associated with differences in the health services use of rural Nova Scotians?

Langille, Donald, Rainham, Daniel and Kisely, Steve (2012) Is francophone language status associated with differences in the health services use of rural Nova Scotians?. Canadian Journal of Public Health-Revue Canadienne De Sante Publique, 103 1: 65-68.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Langille, Donald
Rainham, Daniel
Kisely, Steve
Title Is francophone language status associated with differences in the health services use of rural Nova Scotians?
Journal name Canadian Journal of Public Health-Revue Canadienne De Sante Publique   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0008-4263
Publication date 2012-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 103
Issue 1
Start page 65
End page 68
Total pages 4
Place of publication Ottawa, ON, Canada
Publisher Canadian Public Health Association
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Research suggests that Canadian francophones living in minority contexts have little access to health services in French and are more likely to receive poorer health services. We examined whether francophones in one Nova Scotia (NS) community showed different patterns of health service use from anglophones in similar rural communities, or the NS population overall.
Methods: We used administrative data to calculate 10-year cumulative incidence rate ratios for the period 1996-2005 for treated cancers, circulatory diseases, diabetes and psychiatric disorders in Clare (population 8,815, predominantly francophone) and compared these with six predominantlyAnglophone communities (total population 38,147) using data for the province overall as the reference standard. We also compared 10-year treated incidence rate ratios for visits to family physicians and specialists and for admissions to hospital.
Results: Treatment incidence rates for all four disease groups in all rural areas were  dominated by family physician visits and hospital visits; visits to specialists for some disease outcomes were often lower in rural communities. Visits to psychiatric  specialists were especially low in rural communities, irrespective of language status, being 30% less than for the province overall. No significant differences in treated  disease incidence were detected between Clare and the comparison anglophone  communities. Treated incidence rate ratios for diabetes and circulatory diseases were significantly higher in Clare and the rural anglophone communities relative to the province overall.
Conclusion: The patterns of health care use and treated disease incidence seen in Clare and the comparison areas are more likely a function of rurality than they are of language.
Keyword Language
communities
rural health
disease incidence
access
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 07 Jan 2013, 09:39:59 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Medicine