A Health Systems Research mapping exercise in 26 low- and middle income countries: Narratives from health systems researchers, policy brokers and policy-makers

Decoster, Kristof, Appelmans, An and Hill, Peter (2012) A Health Systems Research mapping exercise in 26 low- and middle income countries: Narratives from health systems researchers, policy brokers and policy-makers Geneva, Switzerland: Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Decoster, Kristof
Appelmans, An
Hill, Peter
Title of report A Health Systems Research mapping exercise in 26 low- and middle income countries: Narratives from health systems researchers, policy brokers and policy-makers
Publication date 2012
Publisher Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research
Place of publication Geneva, Switzerland
Start page 1
End page 53
Total pages 53
Language eng
Subjects 1699 Other Studies in Human Society
Abstract/Summary There has been increasing attention for health systems research in the world, including in lowand middle income countries, with recent developments both in terms of its definition, and in the evolution of theory and methodologies. In 2011, a team from the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), Antwerp was tasked by the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research to map health systems research capacity, health systems research undertaken and policy uptake of this research in a number of low-and middle income countries. Using an innovative and cost-efficient approach, the team drew on winners of a 2010 essay competition (Emerging Voices) linked to the First Global Symposium on Health Systems Research and ITM alumni to conduct interviews with senior health systems researchers, high-level policy makers and policy brokers in 26 LMICs. Their narratives and stories provide insight into how these three categories within the research-policy continuum conceptualize health systems research, interpret their roles, assess the health systems research capacity in their country as well as the scope of health systems research undertaken, and assess potential policy uptake. Health systems research as an emergent discipline in these contexts is dependent on a cluster of enabling factors, identified in this research: charismatic and strategically thinking individuals with a talent for networking, technical competence and scientific credibility, appropriate international alliances and trends, emergent local knowledge translation structures and increasing national ownership of research agendas, more and better training courses for researchers as well as workshops for decision makers to make them more attuned to each others’ world and constraints, increasing trust between decision makers and researchers, a critical mass of health systems researchers and competing institutions ‘able to deliver’, an entry point for health systems research in decision making circles, sufficient domestic and international funding, and even political transitions, shock events or other windows of opportunity. However, country contexts diverge widely. Where this critical set of enabling factors has not yet been established, health systems research remains undeveloped; nevertheless, in most LMIC countries studied, health systems research appears to be gaining momentum, and its potential for informing policy is increasing.
Q-Index Code AX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes epub ahead of print

Document type: Research Report
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 04 Jan 2013, 14:54:04 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health