Enhanced recognition of words previously presented in a task with nonfocal prospective memory requirements

Loft, Shayne and Humphreys, Michael S. (2012) Enhanced recognition of words previously presented in a task with nonfocal prospective memory requirements. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19 6: 1142-1147. doi:10.3758/s13423-012-0303-1


Author Loft, Shayne
Humphreys, Michael S.
Title Enhanced recognition of words previously presented in a task with nonfocal prospective memory requirements
Journal name Psychonomic Bulletin & Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1069-9384
1531-5320
Publication date 2012-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/s13423-012-0303-1
Volume 19
Issue 6
Start page 1142
End page 1147
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Remembering to perform deferred actions when events are encountered in the future is referred to as event-based prospective memory. Individuals can be slower to respond to ongoing tasks when they have prospective memory task requirements. These costs are interpreted as evidence for cognitive control processes allocated to the prospective memory task, but we know little about these processes. In the present article, the recognition of nontargets previously presented in an ongoing task with prospective memory task requirements provided evidence for the differential processing of individual ongoing task items. Participants performed a lexical decision task, where some participants were required to make an alternative prospective memory response either to a specific word (focal) or to exemplars of a category (nonfocal). Participants were slower to respond to the ongoing task in the nonfocal conditions than in the control condition (costs), regardless of whether or not prospective memory task importance was emphasized. Participants were also slower to respond to the ongoing task in the focal conditions than in the control condition, but only when prospective memory task importance was emphasized. This task was followed by a surprise recognition memory test in which nontarget words from the lexical decision task were intermixed with new words. Focal conditions, but not nonfocal conditions, showed better discrimination on the recognition task, as compared with the control condition. Participants in nonfocal conditions mapped the semantic features of the ongoing task letter strings onto the semantic features of their prospective memory category, and this elaboration in the processing of individual nontargets increased incidental learning and produced the recognition benefit.
Keyword Prospective memory
Ongoing task costs
Recognition
Incidental learning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 31 July 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 30 Dec 2012, 00:41:45 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology