Suspended sediment properties and suspended sediment flux estimates in an inundated urban environment during a major flood event

Brown, Richard and Chanson, Hubert (2012) Suspended sediment properties and suspended sediment flux estimates in an inundated urban environment during a major flood event. Water Resources Research, 48 11: W11523.1-W11523.15.

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Author Brown, Richard
Chanson, Hubert
Title Suspended sediment properties and suspended sediment flux estimates in an inundated urban environment during a major flood event
Journal name Water Resources Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1397
1944-7973
Publication date 2012-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1029/2012WR012381
Volume 48
Issue 11
Start page W11523.1
End page W11523.15
Total pages 15
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract During a major flood event, the inundation of urban environments leads to some complicated flow motion most often associated with significant sediment fluxes. In the present study, a series of field measurements were conducted in an inundated section of the City of Brisbane (Australia) about the peak of a major flood in January 2011. Some experiments were performed to use ADV backscatter amplitude as a surrogate estimate of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) during the flood event. The flood water deposit samples were predominantly silty material with a median particle size about 25 m and they exhibited a non-Newtonian behavior under rheological testing. In the inundated urban environment during the flood, estimates of suspended sediment concentration presented a general trend with increasing SSC for decreasing water depth. The suspended sediment flux data showed some substantial sediment flux amplitudes consistent with the murky appearance of floodwaters. Altogether the results highlighted the large suspended sediment loads and fluctuations in the inundated urban setting associated possibly with a non-Newtonian behavior. During the receding flood, some unusual long-period oscillations were observed (periods about 18 min), although the cause of these oscillations remains unknown. The field deployment was conducted in challenging conditions highlighting a number of practical issues during a natural disaster.
Keyword Concentration
Field investigation
Inundated urban environment
Major flood
Suspended sediment
Suspended sediment flux
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Post-print deposited in line with Sherpa Romeo Policy: author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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