The association between early arterial oxygenation and mortality in ventilated patients with acute ischaemic stroke

Young, Paul, Beasley, Richard, Bailey, Michael, Bellomo, Rinaldo, Eastwood, Glenn M., Nichol, Alistair, Pilcher, David V., Yunos, Nor’azim M., Egi, Moritoki, Hart, Graeme K., Reade, Michael C., Cooper, D. James and Study of Oxygen in Critical Care (SOCC) Group (2012) The association between early arterial oxygenation and mortality in ventilated patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Critical Care and Resuscitation, 14 1: 14-19.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Young, Paul
Beasley, Richard
Bailey, Michael
Bellomo, Rinaldo
Eastwood, Glenn M.
Nichol, Alistair
Pilcher, David V.
Yunos, Nor’azim M.
Egi, Moritoki
Hart, Graeme K.
Reade, Michael C.
Cooper, D. James
Study of Oxygen in Critical Care (SOCC) Group
Total Author Count Override 12
Title The association between early arterial oxygenation and mortality in ventilated patients with acute ischaemic stroke
Journal name Critical Care and Resuscitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1441-2772
Publication date 2012-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 14
Issue 1
Start page 14
End page 19
Total pages 6
Place of publication Strawberry Hills, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: There are conflicting data that suggest that hyperoxia may be associated with either worse or better outcomes in patients suffering a stroke.

Objectives: To investigate the association between PaO 2 in the first 24 hours in the intensive care unit and mortality among ventilated patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Data were extracted from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database.

Participants: Adults ventilated for ischaemic stroke in 129 ICUs in Australia and New Zealand, 2000-2009.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was the odds ratio for inhospital mortality associated with 'worst' PaO 2 considered as a categorical variable, with data divided into deciles and compared with the mortality of the 10th decile. For patients on an FiO 2 of ≥50% at any time in the first 24 hours, 'worst' PaO 2 was defined as the PaO 2 associated with the highest alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. For patients on an FiO 2 of <50%, it was defined as the lowest PaO 2. Secondary outcomes were ICU and hospital length of stay and the proportion of patients in each decile discharged home.

Results: Of the 2643 patients eligible for study inclusion, 1507 (57%) died in hospital. The median 'worst' PaO 2 was 117mmHg (interquartile range, 87-196mmHg). There was no association between worst PaO 2 and mortality, length of stay or likelihood of discharge home.

Conclusions: We found no association between worst arterial oxygen tension in the first 24 hours in ICU and outcome in ventilated patients with ischaemic stroke.
Keyword Hyperoxia
Stroke
Intensive care
Ischaemic stroke
Arterial oxygen tension
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 19 Dec 2012, 13:33:27 EST by Michael Reade on behalf of School of Medicine