The success of Acinetobacter species; genetic, metabolic and virulence attributes

Peleg, Anton Y., de Breij, Anna, Adams, Mark D., Cerqueira, Gustavo M., Mocali, Stefano, Galardini, Marco, Nibbering, Peter H., Earl, Ashlee M., Ward, Doyle V., Paterson, David L., Seifert, Harald and Dijkshoorn, Lenie (2012) The success of Acinetobacter species; genetic, metabolic and virulence attributes. Plos One, 7 10: e46984-1-e46984-11. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0046984


Author Peleg, Anton Y.
de Breij, Anna
Adams, Mark D.
Cerqueira, Gustavo M.
Mocali, Stefano
Galardini, Marco
Nibbering, Peter H.
Earl, Ashlee M.
Ward, Doyle V.
Paterson, David L.
Seifert, Harald
Dijkshoorn, Lenie
Title The success of Acinetobacter species; genetic, metabolic and virulence attributes
Journal name Plos One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2012-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0046984
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue 10
Start page e46984-1
End page e46984-11
Total pages 11
Place of publication San Francisco, C, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
An understanding of why certain Acinetobacter species are more successful in causing nosocomial infections, transmission and epidemic spread in healthcare institutions compared with other species is lacking. We used genomic, phenotypic and virulence studies to identify differences between Acinetobacter species. Fourteen strains representing nine species were examined. Genomic analysis of six strains showed that the A. baumannii core genome contains many genes important for diverse metabolism and survival in the host. Most of the A. baumannii core genes were also present in one or more of the less clinically successful species. In contrast, when the accessory genome of an individual A. baumannii strain was compared to a strain of a less successful species (A. calcoaceticus RUH2202), many operons with putative virulence function were found to be present only in the A. baumannii strain, including the csu operon, the acinetobactin chromosomal cluster, and bacterial defence mechanisms. Phenotype microarray analysis showed that compared to A. calcoaceticus (RUH2202), A. baumannii ATCC 19606 T was able to utilise nitrogen sources more effectively and was more tolerant to pH, osmotic and antimicrobial stress. Virulence differences were also observed, with A. baumannii ATCC 19606 T, A. pittii SH024, and A. nosocomialis RUH2624 persisting and forming larger biofilms on human skin than A. calcoaceticus. A. baumannii ATCC 19606 T and A. pittii SH024 were also able to survive in a murine thigh infection model, whereas the other two species were eradicated. The current study provides important insights into the elucidation of differences in clinical relevance among Acinetobacter species.
Keyword Human skin equivalent
Epithelial-cells
Molecular characterization
Baumannii complex
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article numbere46984

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 40 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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