Organising the teaching load in urban general practice:a study of single learner(SLL) and multiple learner(MLL)practices

Henderson, Margaret, Dick, Marie-Louise, Janamian, Tina and Sturman, Nancy (2012). Organising the teaching load in urban general practice:a study of single learner(SLL) and multiple learner(MLL)practices. In: Vertical Integration. General Practice Education and Training Conference 2012, Melbourne, Australia, (). 5 - 6 September 2012.

Author Henderson, Margaret
Dick, Marie-Louise
Janamian, Tina
Sturman, Nancy
Title of paper Organising the teaching load in urban general practice:a study of single learner(SLL) and multiple learner(MLL)practices
Conference name General Practice Education and Training Conference 2012
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 5 - 6 September 2012
Proceedings title Vertical Integration
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Oral presentation
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Aim
To compare the organisation of teaching between single level learner (SLL) and multiple level learner (MLL) urban general practices.
Background
The literature about increasing teaching capacity in general practice has mainly focused on strategies related to teaching models and financial costs. Little literature exists about the relationship between the organisation of teaching and the number of learners accommodated in the practice. Identification of organisational features in urban MLL practices may generate strategies which facilitate increased teaching capacity.
Methods
A paper survey was sent to 184 GP supervisors at 175 Urban South East Queensland general practices identified as having single level learners (GP registrar or medical student) or multiple level learners (GP registrar plus medical student). Information sought included numbers of learners hosted in the previous 12 months, and organisational and teaching methods used.
Results
111 (60.3%) supervisors (from 108 practices) who had hosted at least one learner in the previous year completed the questionnaire. MLL practices were significantly more likely to involve more practice staff (especially practice managers) in the organization and delivery of teaching, and to have other health professional learners in the practice.
Discussion
These results suggest that the creation of a “teaching culture” in practices, involving multiple levels and types of learners and staff, could facilitate practice teaching capacity. Further research is needed to explore the roles of practice managers and other factors contributing to the teaching culture, to further inform strategies for facilitating more learners in a practice without increasing the workload of the teaching doctors.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Discipline of General Practice Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 12 Dec 2012, 15:12:47 EST by Shani Lamb on behalf of Discipline of General Practice