The optomotor maze: a population assay for visual perception in Drosophila

van Swinderen, Bruno (2011) The optomotor maze: a population assay for visual perception in Drosophila. Cold Spring Harbor Protocols, 6 11: 1337-1339. doi:10.1101/pdb.prot066530


Author van Swinderen, Bruno
Title The optomotor maze: a population assay for visual perception in Drosophila
Formatted title
The optomotor maze: a population assay for visual perception in Drosophila
Journal name Cold Spring Harbor Protocols   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1940-3402
1559-6095
Publication date 2011-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1101/pdb.prot066530
Volume 6
Issue 11
Start page 1337
End page 1339
Total pages 3
Place of publication Woodbury, NY, United States
Publisher Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Vision is a major sensory modality in Drosophila behavior, with more than one-half of the Drosophila brain devoted to visual processing. The mechanisms of vision in Drosophila can now be studied in individuals and in populations of flies by using various paradigms. The optomotor maze, described here, is a novel and efficient approach for querying visual perception in Drosophila populations. The optomotor maze setup is very simple: An eight-choice maze consisting of 3-mm paths grooved into a transparent Plexiglas or acrylic slab is placed over an upturned cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor on which visuals are displayed. The placement or movement of the visuals on the CRT, which the flies can see through the flat bottom of the maze, influences their turning behavior at each choice point. This paradigm can be adapted for visual learning by simply rerunning flies in the maze (habituation) or as a more sophisticated version of the aversive phototaxic suppression (APS) paradigm.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 07 Dec 2012, 12:30:08 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute