Do left and right asymmetries of hemispheric preference interact with attention to predict local and global performance in applied tasks?

Jackson, Chris J., Hobman, Elizabeth V., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Martin, Robin (2012) Do left and right asymmetries of hemispheric preference interact with attention to predict local and global performance in applied tasks?. Laterality, 17 6: 647-672. doi:10.1080/1357650X.2011.615125


Author Jackson, Chris J.
Hobman, Elizabeth V.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Martin, Robin
Title Do left and right asymmetries of hemispheric preference interact with attention to predict local and global performance in applied tasks?
Journal name Laterality   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-650X
1464-0678
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/1357650X.2011.615125
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 647
End page 672
Total pages 26
Place of publication Hove, E. Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Many cognitive neuroscience studies show that the ability to attend to and identify global or local information is lateralised between the two hemispheres in the human brain; the left hemisphere is biased towards the local level, whereas the right hemisphere is biased towards the global level. Results of two studies show attention-focused people with a right ear preference (biased towards the left hemisphere) are better at local tasks, whereas people with a left ear preference (biased towards the right hemisphere) are better at more global tasks. In a third study we determined if right hemisphere-biased followers who attend to global stimuli are likely to have a stronger relationship between attention and globally based supervisor ratings of performance. Results provide evidence in support of this hypothesis. Our research supports our model and suggests that the interaction between attention and lateral preference is an important and novel predictor of work-related outcomes.
Keyword Attention
Hemispheric asymmetries
Lateral preference
Ear preference
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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