The assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders trial (ASPIRE): a pre-planned meta-analysis of three independent randomised controlled trial evaluations of ageing in place initiatives in New Zealand

Parsons, Matthew, Senior, Hugh E. J., Kerse, Ngaire, Chen, Mei-hua, Jacobs, Stephen, Vanderhoorn, Stephen, Brown, Paul M. and Anderson, Craig (2012) The assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders trial (ASPIRE): a pre-planned meta-analysis of three independent randomised controlled trial evaluations of ageing in place initiatives in New Zealand. Age and Ageing, 41 6: 722-728.


Author Parsons, Matthew
Senior, Hugh E. J.
Kerse, Ngaire
Chen, Mei-hua
Jacobs, Stephen
Vanderhoorn, Stephen
Brown, Paul M.
Anderson, Craig
Title The assessment of services promoting independence and recovery in elders trial (ASPIRE): a pre-planned meta-analysis of three independent randomised controlled trial evaluations of ageing in place initiatives in New Zealand
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
1468-2834
Publication date 2012-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afs113
Volume 41
Issue 6
Start page 722
End page 728
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Introduction: Intermediate care has been developed to support older people to remain living in their own homes, combining a higher level of support with a rehabilitation focus. Evidence around their effectiveness remains mixed and there is ambiguity around the components.

Aims: To establish the impact of intermediate care on institutional free survival in frail older people referred for needs assessment in New Zealand (NZ).

Methods: pre-planned meta-analysis of three randomised controlled trials with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A total of 567 older people at risk of permanent institutionalisation as well as their primary informal carer (n = 234) were randomised to either intermediate or usual care. Interventions had common key features of care management, though varied in the use of ongoing care provision.

Results: The adjusted hazard ratio for the combined primary outcome of death or residential entry was 31% lower with a 95% confidence interval of (9%, 47%) for the intermediate care initiatives compared with usual care.

Conclusion: Intermediate care utilising a care management approach reduces a frail older person's risk of mortality and permanent institutionalisation.
Keyword Intermediate care
Care management
Ageing in place
Institutionalisation
Older people
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published online: 22 August 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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