Deviance in organizational group decision-making: the role of information processing, confidence, and elaboration

Rijnbout, Jasmine S. and McKimmie, Blake M. (2012) Deviance in organizational group decision-making: the role of information processing, confidence, and elaboration. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 15 6: 813-828. doi:10.1177/1368430212447136


Author Rijnbout, Jasmine S.
McKimmie, Blake M.
Title Deviance in organizational group decision-making: the role of information processing, confidence, and elaboration
Journal name Group Processes and Intergroup Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4302
1461-7188
Publication date 2012-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1368430212447136
Volume 15
Issue 6
Start page 813
End page 828
Total pages 16
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract While deviance can foster innovation within groups, research does not always find beneficial effects. The current studies provide an information processing account of the influence of deviants in group decision-making. We predicted deviants would undermine decision confidence and promote greater elaboration when tasks were difficult. Study 1 manipulated the strength (systematic cue) and gender (heuristic cue) of a job applicant to investigate the effect of a deviant in a difficult task. As predicted, a deviant was associated with lowered confidence, greater elaboration, and higher decision quality, but also decreased group cohesion and task satisfaction. Study 2 investigated the effect of a deviant during a simple task and found the same decrease in group cohesion and task satisfaction, but this time with no increase in elaboration or improvement in decision outcome quality. Results indicate that deviance, when seen as justified, has the potential to reduce the occurrence of prejudice and produce fairer decision outcomes during decision-making.
Keyword Decision-making
Deviance
Group processes
Information processing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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