Cognitive mediation of intervention effects on physical exercise: causal models for the adoption and maintenance stage

Fuchs, Reinhard, Seelig, Harald, Göhner, Wiebke, Burton, Nicola W. and Brown, Wendy J. (2012) Cognitive mediation of intervention effects on physical exercise: causal models for the adoption and maintenance stage. Psychology and Health, 27 12: 1480-1499. doi:10.1080/08870446.2012.695020

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Author Fuchs, Reinhard
Seelig, Harald
Göhner, Wiebke
Burton, Nicola W.
Brown, Wendy J.
Title Cognitive mediation of intervention effects on physical exercise: causal models for the adoption and maintenance stage
Journal name Psychology and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0887-0446
1476-8321
Publication date 2012-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2012.695020
Volume 27
Issue 12
Start page 1480
End page 1499
Total pages 20
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To investigate how the effects of a group-based intervention program (MoVo-LISA) on exercise behaviour were mediated by cognitive variables. Different causal models mapping the short-term (adoption) and long-term (maintenance) intervention effects were tested using path analyses.
Design: N = 220 in-patients of a rehabilitation clinic were assigned to an usual care or intervention group (quasi-experimental design). Questionnaire-based assessment was conducted at baseline; discharge; and at six weeks, six months and 12 months post discharge.
Measures: The potential mediator variables were outcome expectations, self-efficacy, strength of goal intention (intention strength), self-concordance, action planning and barrier management.
Results: Observed intervention effects on exercise behaviour (p < 0.05) were mediated by intention strength at the adoption and maintenance stages, by action planning only at the adoption, and by barrier management only at the maintenance stage. Self-efficacy and outcome expectations were only indirectly involved in these mediations by affecting intention strength and self-concordance.
Conclusion: This is the first study to track the cognitive mediation processes of intervention effects on exercise behaviour over a long time-period by differentiating the adoption and maintenance stages of behaviour change. The findings emphasise the importance of deconstructing intervention effects (modifiability vs. predictive power of a mediator) to develop more effective interventions.
Keyword Mediator
Physical activity
Group intervention
Path analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 19 Nov 2012, 11:35:49 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences