On determining appropriate aerosol optical depth values for atmospheric correction of satellite imagery for biophysical parameter retrieval: requirements and limitations under Australian conditions

Gillingham, S. S., Flood, N. and Gill, T. K. (2013) On determining appropriate aerosol optical depth values for atmospheric correction of satellite imagery for biophysical parameter retrieval: requirements and limitations under Australian conditions. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 34 6: 2089-2100. doi:10.1080/01431161.2012.738945


Author Gillingham, S. S.
Flood, N.
Gill, T. K.
Title On determining appropriate aerosol optical depth values for atmospheric correction of satellite imagery for biophysical parameter retrieval: requirements and limitations under Australian conditions
Journal name International Journal of Remote Sensing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0143-1161
1366-5901
Publication date 2013
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01431161.2012.738945
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 2089
End page 2100
Total pages 12
Place of publication Essex, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Atmospheric correction of high spatial resolution (10–30 m pixel sizes) satellite
imagery for use in large-area land-cover monitoring is difficult due to the lack of aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates made coincident with image acquisition. We present a methodology to determine the upper and lower bounds of AOD estimates that allow the subsequent calculation of a biophysical variable of interest to a pre-determined precision. Knowledge of that range can be used to identify an appropriate method for estimating AOD. We applied the methodology to Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data in Queensland (QLD) and New South Wales (NSW), Australia, and determined that AOD must be estimated within approximately 0.05 of actual AOD for retrieval of foliage projective cover (FPC) to a precision of 10%. That knowledge was then used to determine the relative merit of using a fixed constant, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) climatology, or dense dark vegetation (DDV) method for estimating AOD in QLD and NSW. It was found that using a fixed AOD of 0.05 allows estimates of FPC within 10% of their true value when the true value of AOD is less than 0.1. Such AOD values account for approximately 90% of all inland observations and 65% of coastal observations as determined by analysis of data obtained from AERONET. Using an AERONET climatology to estimate AOD was found to increase the likelihood of accurate FPC retrieval in coastal locations to 83%, although it should be noted that AERONET data are very sparse. DDV has potential in eastern and central areas for retrieving AOD observations with greater precision than fixed values or climatologies. However, more work is needed to understand the temporal variation of vegetation reflectance before the DDV method can be used operationally.
Keyword Satellite imagery
Biophysical parameter retrieval
Atmospheric correction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Version of record first published: 12 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Created: Mon, 19 Nov 2012, 07:33:41 EST by Neil Flood on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management