Viral pathogens of banana: outstanding questions and options for control

Geering, A. D. W. (2009). Viral pathogens of banana: outstanding questions and options for control. In: D. Jones and I. Van den Bergh, International Symposium On Recent Advances in Banana Crop Protection for Sustainable Production and Improved Livelihoods. International Symposium on Recent Advances in Banana Crop Protection for Sustainable Production and Improved Livelihoods, White River, South Africa, (39-50). 1 May 2009.

Author Geering, A. D. W.
Title of paper Viral pathogens of banana: outstanding questions and options for control
Conference name International Symposium on Recent Advances in Banana Crop Protection for Sustainable Production and Improved Livelihoods
Conference location White River, South Africa
Conference dates 1 May 2009
Proceedings title International Symposium On Recent Advances in Banana Crop Protection for Sustainable Production and Improved Livelihoods   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-90-6605-488-2
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor D. Jones
I. Van den Bergh
Volume 828
Start page 39
End page 50
Total pages 12
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary The viruses naturally infecting banana include Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), Banana mild mosaic virus (BanMMV), Banana virus X (BVX) and the banana streak viruses (BSVs). BBTV is still regarded as the most damaging of the viruses and continues to expand in geographic distribution. The epidemiology of BBTV is very simple, and in Australia it has been effectively controlled and even eradicated from some regions through a combination of roguing, clean planting material schemes and domestic quarantine. BSVs impact on production directly by reducing yield, but also indirectly because of the problems they cause to Musa breeding programmes. Estimates of yield loss from BSVs vary widely but the factors contributing to this variation are largely unknown. All progenitors of the domesticated banana have integrated badnavirus DNA. However, only integrants associated with the B genome in hybrid genetic backgrounds are known to initiate infection. An outstanding question is why the rate of activation of BSV integrants in some hybrids, such as ‘Goldfinger’ (syn. ‘FHIA-01’, AAAB genome), is low whilst it is high in other cultivars. Two recently discovered viruses, BVX and BanMMV, were discovered in the course of other virus research. There is indirect evidence that BanMMV is transmitted between plants in the field but, as yet, attempts to find a vector have been unsuccessful. Genetic engineering for virus resistance remains a promising technology, although probably more than a decade away from implementation because of regulatory problems and issues of public acceptance.
Keyword Banana bunchy top virus
Banana bract mosaic virus
Banana streak disease
Banana mild mosaic virus
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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