NATSISS crowding data: what does it assume and how can we challenge the orthodoxy?

Memmott, Paul, Greenop, Kelly, Clarke, Andrew, Go-Sam, Carroll, Birdsall-Jones, Christina, Harvey-Jones, William, Corunna, Vanessa and Western, Mark (2012). NATSISS crowding data: what does it assume and how can we challenge the orthodoxy?. In: Boyd Hunter and Nicholas Biddle, Survey Analysis for Indigenous Policy in Australia: Social Science Perspectives. Social Science Perspectives on the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Social Survey, Canberra, ACT, Australia, (241-279). 11-12 April 2011.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Memmott, Paul
Greenop, Kelly
Clarke, Andrew
Go-Sam, Carroll
Birdsall-Jones, Christina
Harvey-Jones, William
Corunna, Vanessa
Western, Mark
Title of paper NATSISS crowding data: what does it assume and how can we challenge the orthodoxy?
Conference name Social Science Perspectives on the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Social Survey
Conference location Canberra, ACT, Australia
Conference dates 11-12 April 2011
Convener Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR); Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)
Proceedings title Survey Analysis for Indigenous Policy in Australia: Social Science Perspectives
Series Research monograph (Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research)
Place of Publication The Australian National University
Publisher ANU E Press
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781922144188
9781922144195
Editor Boyd Hunter
Nicholas Biddle
Volume 32
Start page 241
End page 279
Total pages 39
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In this paper we consider the sociospatial problem of crowding in Indigenous Australia. Quantitative data are regularly collected in Census and other social surveys by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) to create quantitative indices of the extent of household utilisation and then ‘overcrowding’ in Australian society in general, and amongst the Australian Indigenous population in particular. However, in our view, the identification of states of Indigenous crowding requires an understanding of distinct cultural constructs to achieve greater validity of measurement. Our analysis also refers to the interconnected nature of Indigenous crowding and homelessness, a relatedness that has been seldom addressed in the literature,1 despite its importance to policy development in the Indigenous sector including effects on housing, family violence, education and health.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This monograph presents the refereed, and peer-reviewed, edited proceedings of a conference organised by Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR); Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS): "Survey Analysis for Indigenous policy in Australia: Social science perspectives"

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 128 Abstract Views, 8 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 16 Nov 2012, 10:28:25 EST by Dr Kelly Greenop on behalf of School of Architecture