Examination of the distribution of Arsenic in hydrated and fresh cowpea roots using two- and three-dimensional techniques

Kopittke, Peter M., de Jonge, Martin D., Menzies, Neal W., Wang, Peng, Donner, Erica, McKenna, Brigid A., Paterson, David, Howard, Daryl L. and Lombi, Enzo (2012) Examination of the distribution of Arsenic in hydrated and fresh cowpea roots using two- and three-dimensional techniques. Plant Physiology, 159 3: 1149-1158. doi:10.1104/pp.112.197277


Author Kopittke, Peter M.
de Jonge, Martin D.
Menzies, Neal W.
Wang, Peng
Donner, Erica
McKenna, Brigid A.
Paterson, David
Howard, Daryl L.
Lombi, Enzo
Title Examination of the distribution of Arsenic in hydrated and fresh cowpea roots using two- and three-dimensional techniques
Journal name Plant Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-0889
1532-2548
Publication date 2012-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1104/pp.112.197277
Volume 159
Issue 3
Start page 1149
End page 1158
Total pages 10
Place of publication Rockville, MD, United States
Publisher American Society of Plant Biologists
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Arsenic (As) is considered to be the environmental contaminant of greatest concern due to its potential accumulation in the food
chain and in humans. Using novel synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence techniques (including sequential computed
tomography), short-term solution culture studies were used to examine the spatial distribution of As in hydrated and fresh
roots of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata ‘Red Caloona’) seedlings exposed to 4 or 20 mm arsenate [As(V)] or 4 or 20 mm arsenite. For
plants exposed to As(V), the highest concentrations were observed internally at the root apex (meristem), with As also
accumulating in the root border cells and at the endodermis. When exposed to arsenite, the endodermis was again a site of
accumulation, although no As was observed in border cells. For As(V), subsequent transfer of seedlings to an As-free solution
resulted in a decrease in tissue As concentrations, but growth did not improve. These data suggest that, under our experimental
conditions, the accumulation of As causes permanent damage to the meristem. In addition, we suggest that root border cells
possibly contribute to the plant’s ability to tolerate excess As(V) by accumulating high levels of As and limiting its movement
into the root.
Keyword Oryza-sativa L.
Soil solution
Border cells
Rice grains
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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