A multicentre evaluation of two intensive care unit triage protocols for use in an influenza pandemic

Cheung, Winston K., Myburgh, John, Seppelt, Ian M., Parr, Michael J., Blackwell, Nikki, DeMonte, Shannon, Gandhi, Kalpesh, Hoyling, Larissa, Nair, Priya, Passer, Melissa, Reynolds, Claire, Saunders, Nicholas M., Saxena, Manoj K., Thanakrishnan, Govindasamy and on behalf of the Influenza Pandemic ICU Triage (iPIT) Study Investigators (2012) A multicentre evaluation of two intensive care unit triage protocols for use in an influenza pandemic. Medical Journal of Australia, 197 3: 178-181.


Author Cheung, Winston K.
Myburgh, John
Seppelt, Ian M.
Parr, Michael J.
Blackwell, Nikki
DeMonte, Shannon
Gandhi, Kalpesh
Hoyling, Larissa
Nair, Priya
Passer, Melissa
Reynolds, Claire
Saunders, Nicholas M.
Saxena, Manoj K.
Thanakrishnan, Govindasamy
on behalf of the Influenza Pandemic ICU Triage (iPIT) Study Investigators
Total Author Count Override 14
Title A multicentre evaluation of two intensive care unit triage protocols for use in an influenza pandemic
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 2012-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5694/mja11.10926
Volume 197
Issue 3
Start page 178
End page 181
Total pages 4
Place of publication Strawberry Hills, NSW Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Objective: To determine the increase in intensive care unit (ICU) bed availability that would result from the use of the New South Wales and Ontario Health Plan for an Influenza Pandemic (OHPIP) triage protocols. 
Design, setting and patients:  Prospective evaluation study conducted in eight Australian, adult, general ICUs, between September 2009 and May 2010. All patients who were admitted to the ICU, excluding those who had elective surgery, were prospectively evaluated using the two triage protocols, simulating a pandemic situation. Both protocols were originally developed to determine which patients should be excluded from accessing ICU resources during an influenza pandemic.  Main outcome measure: Increase in ICU bed availability.
Results: At admission, the increases in ICU bed availability using Tiers 1, 2 and 3
of the NSW triage protocol were 3.5%, 14.7% and 22.7%, respectively, and
52.8% using the OHPIP triage protocol (P < 0.001). Re-evaluation of patients at
12 hours after admission using Tiers 1, 2 and 3 of the NSW triage protocol
incrementally increased ICU bed availability by 19.2%, 16.1% and 14.1%,
respectively (P < 0.001). The maximal cumulative increases in ICU bed
availability using Tiers 1, 2 and 3 of the NSW triage protocol were 23.7%, 31.6%
and 37.5%, respectively, at 72 hours (P < 0.001), and 65.0% using the OHPIP
triage protocol, at 120 hours (P < 0.001).
Conclusion: Both triage protocols resulted in increases in ICU bed availability,
but the OHPIP protocol provided the greatest increase overall. With the NSW
triage protocol, ICU bed availability increased as the protocol was escalated.
Keyword Clinical protocols
Emergency health services
Intensive care unit (ICU)
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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