Latitudinal and seasonal effects on growth of the Australian eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus)

Lloyd-Jones, Luke R., Wang, You-Gan, Courtney, Anthony J., Prosser, Andrew J. and Montgomery, Steven S. (2012) Latitudinal and seasonal effects on growth of the Australian eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 69 9: 1525-1538. doi:10.1139/F2012-072


Author Lloyd-Jones, Luke R.
Wang, You-Gan
Courtney, Anthony J.
Prosser, Andrew J.
Montgomery, Steven S.
Title Latitudinal and seasonal effects on growth of the Australian eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus)
Formatted title
Latitudinal and seasonal effects on growth of the Australian eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus)
Journal name Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0706-652X
1205-7533
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1139/F2012-072
Volume 69
Issue 9
Start page 1525
End page 1538
Total pages 14
Place of publication Ottawa, ON, Canada
Publisher NRC Research Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The growth of the Australian eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus) is understood in greater detail by quantifying the latitudinal effect. The latitudinal effect is the change in the species’ growth rate during migration. Mark–recapture data (N = 1635, latitude 22.21°S–34.00°S) presents northerly movement of the eastern king prawn, with New South Wales prawns showing substantial average movement of 140 km (standard deviation: 176 km) north. A generalized von Bertalanffy growth model framework is used to incorporate the latitudinal effect together with the canonical seasonal effect. Applying this method to eastern king prawn mark–recapture data guarantees consistent estimates for the latitudinal and seasonal effects. For M. plebejus, it was found that growth rate peaks on 25 and 29 January for males and females, respectively; is at a minimum on 27 and 31 July, respectively; and that the shape parameter, k (per year), changes by –0.0236 and –0.0556 every 1 degree of latitude south increase for males and females, respectively.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mathematics and Physics
Official 2013 Collection
 
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