Hearing-impaired adults are at increased risk of experiencing emotional distress and social engagement restrictions five years later

Gopinath, Bamini, Hickson, Louise, Schneider, Julie, McMahon, Catherine M., Burlutsky, George, Leeder, Stephen R. and Mitchell, Paul (2012) Hearing-impaired adults are at increased risk of experiencing emotional distress and social engagement restrictions five years later. Age and Ageing, 41 5: 618-623. doi:10.1093/ageing/afs058


Author Gopinath, Bamini
Hickson, Louise
Schneider, Julie
McMahon, Catherine M.
Burlutsky, George
Leeder, Stephen R.
Mitchell, Paul
Title Hearing-impaired adults are at increased risk of experiencing emotional distress and social engagement restrictions five years later
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
1468-2834
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afs058
Volume 41
Issue 5
Start page 618
End page 623
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: we aimed to assess both cross-sectional and temporal links between measured hearing impairment and self-perceived hearing handicap, and health outcomes.

Methods: in total, 811 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (Sydney, Australia) aged ≥55 years were examined twice (1997–99 and 2002–04). Hearing levels were measured with pure-tone audiometry. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory (HHIE-S) was administered, scores ≥8 defined hearing handicap.

Results:
baseline hearing impairment was strongly associated with 7 of the 10 HHIE-S questions, 5 years later. Individuals with and without hearing impairment at baseline reported that they felt embarrassed and/or frustrated by their hearing problem, and that it hampered their personal/social life, multivariable-adjusted OR: 11.5 (CI: 3.5–38.1), OR: 6.3 (CI: 2.5–15.7) and OR: 6.0 (CI: 2.1–17.5), respectively, 5 years later. Hearing-impaired, compared with non-hearing-impaired adults had a significantly higher risk of developing moderate or severe hearing handicap, OR: 3.35 (CI: 1.91–5.90) and OR: 6.60 (CI: 1.45–30.00), respectively. Cross-sectionally (at wave 2), hearing handicap increased the odds of depressive symptoms and low self-rated health by 80 and 46%, respectively.

Conclusion:
older, hearing-impaired adults were significantly more likely to experience emotional distress and social engagement restrictions (self-perceived hearing handicap) directly due to their hearing impairment.
Keyword Age-related hearing loss
Hearing handicap
Incidence
Blue Mountains Hearing Study
Blue Mountains Eye Study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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