Practice-Based Evidence: An Evaluation of the ATAPS and Better Access Initiatives by the Australian Government at the Ipswich & West Moreton Psychology Clinic

Miss Kristy Sippel (2012). Practice-Based Evidence: An Evaluation of the ATAPS and Better Access Initiatives by the Australian Government at the Ipswich & West Moreton Psychology Clinic Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Miss Kristy Sippel
Thesis Title Practice-Based Evidence: An Evaluation of the ATAPS and Better Access Initiatives by the Australian Government at the Ipswich & West Moreton Psychology Clinic
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-11-15
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr. Genevieve Dingle
Professor Kim Halford
Total pages 189
Language eng
Subjects 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract/Summary While potentially effective psychological treatments have been developed to assist many who experience mental health problems, relatively few people with such problems access care, and socially disadvantaged groups are particularly unlikely to access care. The current study assessed the reach of a clinical service providing psychological treatment to the population of an outer urban area of Brisbane, Australia that has a high representation of social disadvantage. It also assessed the clinical outcomes for 365 consecutive client presentations to the service, with all presentations being made as referrals from each client’s doctor under schemes designed to enhance access to psychological treatment. A large proportion of the referred clients did not attend treatment following referral from their doctor, or if they did, it was only for one session. Of the clients who did remain in treatment, a large proportion recovered and made reliable change throughout treatment, such that they were no longer classified as clinical cases at treatment completion. However, some of the groups who identify as hard to reach (in particular, young people under 15 years old and men) used the service at a lower rate and therefore failed to benefit from a service they needed and could have been accessing. Recommendations for methods to retain more referrals were given, which undoubtedly have significant policy and service reform implications if equitable access to high-quality mental health care services is to be achieved.

 
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Created: Thu, 15 Nov 2012, 12:16:52 EST by Miss Kristy Sippel on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences