Determinants of household water conservation: The role of demographic, infrastructure, behavior, and psychosocial variables

Fielding, Kelly S., Russell, Sally, Spinks, Anneliese and Mankad, Aditi (2012) Determinants of household water conservation: The role of demographic, infrastructure, behavior, and psychosocial variables. Water Resources Research, 48 10: W10510.1-W10510.12. doi:10.1029/2012WR012398


Author Fielding, Kelly S.
Russell, Sally
Spinks, Anneliese
Mankad, Aditi
Title Determinants of household water conservation: The role of demographic, infrastructure, behavior, and psychosocial variables
Journal name Water Resources Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1397
1944-7973
Publication date 2012-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1029/2012WR012398
Open Access Status
Volume 48
Issue 10
Start page W10510.1
End page W10510.12
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Securing water supplies in urban areas is a major challenge for policy makers, both now and into the future. This study aimed to identify the key determinants of household water use, with a view to identifying those factors that could be targeted in water demand management campaigns. Objective water use data and surveys were collected from 1008 households in four local government areas of southeast Queensland, Australia. Results showed that demographic, psychosocial, behavioral, and infrastructure variables all have a role to play in determining household water use. Consistent with past research, household occupancy was the most important predictor of water use. Households in regions recently exposed to drought conditions and higher-level restrictions also used less water than those who had less experience with drought. The effect of water efficient technology was mixed: some water efficient appliances were associated with less water use, while others were associated with more water use. Results also demonstrated the importance of considering water use as a collective behavior that is influenced by household dynamics. Households who reported a stronger culture of water conservation used less water. These findings, along with evidence that good water-saving habits are linked to water conservation, highlight the value of policies that support long-term cultural shifts in the way people think about and use water.
Keyword Side Management Policies
Planned Behavior
Demand Management
Consumption
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 21 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 33 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 15 Nov 2012, 11:22:07 EST by System User on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research